Posts tagged ‘Books’

Get your Signed Copy of Ashley Judd’s New Book

This just in!

All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir (Signed) - Ashley Judd

All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir (Signed) - Ashley Judd is available from Brew City Book Lovers for a limited time only.

Now available for a limited time only: Get your signed copy of Ashley Judd’s new memoir, All that is Bitter and Sweet. Signed stock from Brew City Book Lovers is available on a first come, first served basis.

Synopsis provided by book distributor

In this deeply moving and unforgettable memoir, award-winning film and stage actor Ashley Judd describes her odyssey from enjoying a successful career in Hollywood to becoming a fiercely dedicated humanitarian and advocate for those suffering in neglected parts of the world.

After her first trip to the notorious brothels, slums, and hospices of southeast Asia, Ashley began writing extraordinary diaries—on which this memoir is based—expanding her capacity to relate to, and to share with a global audience, stories of survival and resilience.

Along the way, Ashley realized that the coping strategies she had developed to deal with her own emotional pain were no longer working. Read more…

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Used Books: The Royalty Controversy

Half Price Books in downtown Berkeley, California.

Image via Wikipedia

By Mandy Webster

Discount books. We all love to get a deal, especially on a good read. Some of the best deals can be found at rummage sales, online resellers like eBay and Half.com and in used bookstores. Chains like Half Price Books purchase used books for next to nothing and resell them at a price that is usually quite affordable to the general public.

However, many authors are unhappy with the fact that they earn no royalties from the re-sale of their books. To some, this is the Napster Limewire of the book world.

As with any controversy, there are two sides to this debate. Personally, I can understand the concerns of individuals on both sides. As a writer, I can understand why authors will wish to be properly compensated for their work. But a writer’s work is art. Unless, of course, they work in the corporate world, where they are paid by the hour and have no rights to the work produced while on the clock. Read more…

Discussion: Eulalie and the Hopping Head by David Small

Cover of "Eulalie and the Hopping Head"

Cover of Eulalie and the Hopping Head

By Mandy Webster

Eulalie and the Hopping Head. David Small. Macmillan, 2001.

I stumbled upon a description of David Small’s children’s book, Eulalie and the Hopping Head while researching the author for a book discussion on his graphic novel, Stitches. The description caught my attention, so I decided to check this one out from the library to read to my four year old.

My son loved Eulalie, and now, even several days after returning the book, he still talks about her.

On first reading, Avery was scared of Mrs. Shinn, the high-class fox who claims that all nine of her children are absolutely perfect. Personally, I still wonder about Mrs. Shinn, who apparently had seen the poor perfect child, owner of the hopping head, abandoned in the park several days prior and thought nothing of leaving the child there to fend for herself! Read more…

Book Review: When She Hollers by Cynthia Voigt

Cover of "When She Hollers"

Cover of When She Hollers

By Mandy Webster

When She Hollers. Cynthia Voigt. Scholastic Inc. New York. 1994

When She Hollers, a YA novel by Cynthia Voigt, is the story of the day Tish decides to tell the truth about the abuse she has suffered at the hands of her step-father. Spurred by her teacher’s chalk message in the classroom, “The truth will set you free,” Tish is determined to let the truth be known.

The entire novel takes place in the space of one day, a day which begins at the breakfast table where Tish informs her step-father, Tonnie that the knife she holds in her hand will be with her now at all times… when she is in the bathroom and when she is in her bed at night.

Tish tries to explain to her mother that Tonnie comes into her room and even stalks her in the bathroom, but her mother refuses to hear her. She goes to school and tries to be her normal self, whoever that is.

The events of the day unfold, as conversations about a classmate who recently committed suicide Read more…

Book Review: The Florist’s Daughter by Patricia Hampl

Canoes at Phalen Lake, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1905.

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By Mandy Webster

The Florist’s Daughter. Patricia Hampl. Harcourt, Inc. 2007.

Patricia Hampl’s memoir, The Florist’s Daughter, is a wordy trip down the historic path of both Hampl’s life and her home town of St. Paul, Minnesota. Hampl practices her lifetime habit of taking notes at the bedside of her dying mother while wending her way through memories of her middle class life in the middle of America.

While holding her mother’s hand, the author shares a plethora of memories of her ‘ordinary’ parents who seem extraordinary to her simply because Read more…

Read With Me: January Books

Cover of "A Short Story Writer's Companio...

Cover of A Short Story Writer's Companion

By Mandy Webster

It’s the first list of the new year, let’s see if I picked some decent ones this time.

  • When She Hollers by Cynthia Voigt. Another suggested read by a professor. I’m trying to read everything my professors have read so I can actually join in conversations at school!
  • Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo. Picked this one up at Wal-mart the other day from a $3 bin. I was really disappointed in one of the books I’d chosen for last month (still trying to finish it up by midnight tonight!) So, I thought I’d just grab something that looks like a good read: Something different with an actual plot and an original one at that. Check out the YouTube video below. The audience actually laughs while Evaristo reads an excerpt from the book.
  • A Short Story Writer’s Companion by Tom Bailey. Yeah, I know. I still haven’t managed to get through this one yet. But I aim to finish it by the time I start my next class the end of January! Read more…

Book Review: Tantalize

A Nine-banded Armadillo in the Green Swamp, ce...

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By Mandy Webster

Tantalize. Cynthia Leitich Smith. Candlewick, 2007, 2008

Cynthia Leitich Smith obviously read too many Twilight books (and possibly Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West) before writing her YA gothic fantasy novel, Tantalize. The parallels between these stories are too apparent for this to be a fluke. If I hadn’t already suffered through two and a half of Stephenie Meyer’s vampire/werewolf tomes, I might have been able to take Smith seriously. But, by the time she began introducing were-armadillos into the story, I was through. Were-armadillos? Seriously? That’s when I gave up and returned Tantalize to the library. Read more…